Silent movies and, occasionally, Robert Montgomery.

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Poster for The Phantom Carriage, 1921
Part of review from Total Film (entire review here):

"Using superimposition and double-exposure to bring the rickety wagon and  its wretched occupants to ghostly life, The Phantom Carriage balances  visual poetry with emotional violence. This is [Ingmar] Bergman’s favourite  movie, after all, and it throbs with torment, remorse and vicious  confrontation (“I’ll come to show you God didn’t give a fig about you  and your twaddle,” lashes one intertitle). There’s empathy and hope, too  – attributes often overlooked in Bergman’s own work – while the image  of Death, cloaked and clutching a scythe, would dominate The Seventh  Seal 37 years later.”

Poster for The Phantom Carriage, 1921

Part of review from Total Film (entire review here):

"Using superimposition and double-exposure to bring the rickety wagon and its wretched occupants to ghostly life, The Phantom Carriage balances visual poetry with emotional violence. This is [Ingmar] Bergman’s favourite movie, after all, and it throbs with torment, remorse and vicious confrontation (“I’ll come to show you God didn’t give a fig about you and your twaddle,” lashes one intertitle). There’s empathy and hope, too – attributes often overlooked in Bergman’s own work – while the image of Death, cloaked and clutching a scythe, would dominate The Seventh Seal 37 years later.”

  • 26 June 2011
  • 64